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  • slapchopsuey

    slapchopsuey

    March 11, 2015, 1:16 am

    Scroll down to the bottom half of the article.

    > Phonetic Alphabet

    > Names of the Letters express'd in the reform'd Characters. Sounded as now in Sounds and Characters.

    Lays out each letter, a word with its sound, and description. New letters are just marked as * . Insead of "a b c d e f g, h i j k lmnop, q r s, t u v, w x, y & z" he has "o (new 2nd o) a e i u (new 2nd u), h g k (new sh) (new ng), n r t d l, (new th) (2nd new th), s z f v b p m."

    Say what you will about Ben Franklin, but I'm glad this guy wasn't the head of the Department of Education (if it existed at the the time).

    Reply

  • ElectricRebel

    ElectricRebel

    March 10, 2015, 12:41 pm

    The unions had no power until the government protected them. Early union organizing efforts were basically full blown battles (the Haymarket strike, the Battle of Blair Mountain, the Flint Sit-Down strike, etc).

    It wasn't until the National Labor Relations Act, backed up by FDR's enforcement, that organized labor stood a chance against the Pinkerton goons and the local police.

    "There were still central banks in the states, which was much of the problem. To suggest that a national private currency could not exist today is ridiculous."

    True, but you should have been more clear about that. Central banking implies a national level of control. However, central banking at the state level did allow more competition (remember, states cannot prevent commerce across state lines b/c of the constitution). Also, there were some states in which banks were almost completely deregulated during the era and these were extremely unstable. Wildcat banks were very bad because they caused many people to lose wealth. People should be able to trust a bank and not have to rely on guessing in a world with tons of information asymmetry.

    I want to point something else out... I think that we may evolve into something like what you want anyways because of technology. Anonymous internet banking may eventually take over as a superior method of doing financial transactions, so my point on central banks may be moot in the long run. However, at the current time, private currencies have not demonstrated success compared to centrally controlled fiat currency. Who knows what is the right answer in the long run though. I can only go off of evidence. Maybe both systems are flawed (read about energy accounting, which may be the only "real" system of accounting in that it is tied to the physical world). I have no idea what will happen in the long run, but I think we should go with whatever works based on evidence, not what sounds good in theory.

    "If there is no chance for them to corrupt the government, then they cannot."

    For this to be true, the government has to not exist. And I'm convinced that if we went with anarcho-capitalism, one of the private insurance companies would eventually get a monopoly and become the new government.

    Reply

  • johnleemk

    johnleemk

    March 10, 2015, 9:30 am

    I don't have a great relationship with my sisters, but if I found out something like this had happened to them, I'd fucking finish the person behind it. They wouldn't know what hit them. I don't give a flying fuck who you are, you do not mess with my flesh and blood.

    In this case, it isn't even really one of your brother's friends -- it's one of his girlfriend's friends who he happens to know and get along with vaguely. Trust me, if you have even a half-decent relationship with your brother, blood will be way thicker than water.

    Tell him.

    Reply

  • HyperSpaz

    HyperSpaz

    March 11, 2015, 6:26 am

    For short: It satisfies *phi^2=phi+1*. Easier to visualize: If you put lengths of *phi* and *1* on ends, the ratio between the whole length and the larger is also *phi*. This self-similarity is probably what gives *phi* its alleged aesthetic value for which it was praised by Renaissance artists. Beware, though: It's not very hard to find an approximate Golden Ratio in a sufficiently large structure, even if it was not put there intentionally.

    Alfred Beutelspacher wrote a nice book on the Golden Ratio; if you read it, you will also come across how *phi* arises from the recursively deined Fibonacci sequence as the limit of two consecutive numbers in it.

    Reply

  • Naieve

    Naieve

    March 11, 2015, 6:44 am

    You have to understand, about 2/3 of the money is meant to be funneled off to the people who bribed Congress to write the bill as they did. That money will partially be funneled back to the Congressmen who wrote it. In the form of campaign contributions, jobs for family members, and jobs when they leave office.

    I'm continually amazed how everyone thinks the Republicans were robbing us blind and the Democrats had no idea. The Democrats were neck deep in it, and are blocking all investigations into the war and the profiteering specifically to make sure they don't get in trouble.

    Reply

  • miked4o7

    miked4o7

    March 10, 2015, 5:08 pm

    Yes, but the existence of private insurance actually is not our biggest driver of unnecessary costs. There have been tons of studies out there that show that an entire 1/3 of our total expenditures in healthcare in this country go towards treatments and procedures that don't improve our outcomes at all. The reason that happens, unfortunately, is Medicare's pay-per-service fee structure. If we went to a single-payer system that just completely adopted Medicare's practices without fixing the way Medicare works right now, we'd be completely F'ed.

    Reply

  • bobo69

    bobo69

    March 10, 2015, 10:11 am

    Yeah, but Orbital sampled it without permission (and I'm pretty sure the amount they sampled might cross the 'fair use' definition these days). A few years back, I actually had a chance to ask King Coffee, the BHS drummer (he also runs Trance Records, a local label), about this and he told me how they contacted Orbital about it and Orbital was really surprised that the BHS had even heard the song. The BHS didn't make a stink out of it or anything, which is pretty cool.

    For the record, I've seen the BHS and Orbital each live twice on different occasions, and they both put on a very cool show. :)

    Reply

  • Sqwalnoc

    Sqwalnoc

    March 10, 2015, 9:33 am

    * 3.141592 thats all i can remember off the top of my head

    * I don't like baseball because its a boooring sport and there isnt much call for it in the UK, I am not a communist

    * Sir lancelot of camelot

    * To seek the holy grail

    * blue

    * I'd pick the one that can carry a coconut the furthest

    * Nah, pepper makes me sneeze

    * boxers

    * trying to find his long lost brother Pablo

    * If you leave me now, it'll take away the biggest part of me, o-oo-oo-o-oo baby please don't gooooo

    * partial cloud cover, wind speed approx 5kph, humidity 67%, air pressure approx 1000 millibars temperature approx 11 degrees celsius

    Reply

  • dbzer0

    dbzer0

    March 11, 2015, 9:51 am

    >There is something else you don't understand: having a "parasite" in the organization necessarily raises the costs of the services or products they sell, and an organization designed to cut out that element will naturally be more favorable to consumers by virtue of price alone.

    There's something you don't understand in that Capitalism was never first about profit but first about domination. This is why industrial machinery was used to replace skilled artisans even though it created less quality or work and therefore less profits. It's the same reason why the managerial class persists, even though there's lots of evidence to point out that it's harmful.

    You are still under the mistaken impression that we have a free market which would naturally remove such elements. We do not and such a market cannot exist as long as Capitalism does.

    Reply

  • alkemist

    alkemist

    March 10, 2015, 8:28 pm

    At the time the notion of "patentability" was first conceived, it was clear to everybody that there was a distinction between abstract ideas and actual things. The whole idea of software and computing challenges this notion directly; the line is no longer clear and may not exist. Any machine could be described in a suitable language, and any piece of software could be interpreted as a description of a machine, since it would be possible to create a physical chip with the same function as the software.

    So is the only way to have patents to require that applicants prove an intent to produce a physical machine? You could get around that by saying your product is a computer with your software installed (and I believe people have obtained such patents). Though surely such a patent would be invalid, as it is merely an aggregation of two unpatentable things. In the age of mechanical computability patents appear to have no place. And anyway, the point of patents was to encourage people to disclose inventions rather than keep them secret, but I don't exactly see anybody going to the patent database to learn anything, since patents are unreadable trash.

    Reply

  • PSBlake

    PSBlake

    March 10, 2015, 8:47 pm

    This could have something to do with it, as could my height (I hit 6' sometime around age 12), and the fact that I didn't have any of the stereotypical physical hangups associated with being a nerd, like poor vision, poor dexterity, or a string of unpronounceable medical conditions. Still, I'm probably not fully conveying the nature of my reputation: I was perceived as some kind of comic-book-character. If I announced to the student population that I had just taught myself telekinesis, virtually none of the students would be surprised in the slightest. Only a few of the teachers would have been.

    Then again, it could just be that I grew up in East Tennessee.

    Reply

  • Fidodo

    Fidodo

    March 10, 2015, 4:05 pm

    It took me a few seconds to see it, but there's definitely something deliberate there. I mean even if it is just a coincidence it's still interesting and worth 10 seconds of my time. I mean is your time so valuable that seeing this thing that isn't interesting enough for you makes you mad? Why are people so bitter here? I just read a comment comparing a kids death to hitler. I used to like to read comments because they were insightful and added something to the article but now it's just "this isn't interesting enough to be on the front page" or "why should I care". Really, what are redditors doing that's so important?

    Reply

  • eaturbrainz

    eaturbrainz

    March 10, 2015, 11:06 pm

    If they're a defeated people, why do they keep attacking our civilians instead of suing for peace? We've offered peace to them multiple times and received a rejection on each one, no matter how good a deal we offered. The average Palestinian Arab just wants to get on with their life without having to care about whether there are Jews on the other side of the border or not (they'd prefer not, though), but the ones involved in politics have decided that any deal which allows Israel to exist is a failure, and that any leader who so fails the Palestinian cause must die.

    Reply

  • just4this

    just4this

    March 10, 2015, 9:19 am

    I've been trying to tell people this for a long time. If you want to judge whether a politician is interested in actually fixing the system, count how many times he uses these terms:

    * ICD-9

    * CPT

    * X12.N

    * HL7

    It's not that those terms are core to the topic but they inevitably come up during any serious discussion.

    People also need to consider the differences and similarities between veterinary medicine and human medicine. Discounting the increased popularity of extreme veterinary procudures such as kidney transplants for cats, reconstructive orthopedic surgery for dogs, and prescriptions for chronic conditions you'll find that veterinary costs have not risen at anything like the rate of human medicine.

    Add to that analysis the fact that certain aspects of human healthcare have decreased in cost (such as rhinoplasties and lasik) and you will see that anywhere insurance companies *and the government* are involved, costs have spiraled upwards out of control.

    Great improvements could be made if:

    * health insurance was no longer through employers

    * payers and providers don't have contracts between them

    * restrictions on payer competition are removed

    * the government got out of the business except as an enforcer of contracts

    In other words, any individual or group of individuals could approach any payer for coverage. Then, that coverage could be used to pay any provider.

    Of course, this strips power from Washington so it won't happen.

    Reply

  • khast

    khast

    March 11, 2015, 7:41 am

    I don't know what other kind of confession that you could get out of someone who is innocent.

    If you were threatening to do something incredibly painful, or even repeat waterboarding until I told them what they want to hear... I'd tell them where my grandmother keeps her savings...i'd tell them what they want to hear, just to make the pain stop.

    If you are sure someone knows something and you are given orders to torture until they say something.....but the person really doesn't know anything...what are you going to get?

    Reply

  • RandyPonce

    RandyPonce

    March 11, 2015, 1:26 am

    I remember reading all this stuff about John Titor when it was happening and couldn't believe the number of people who believed it. What was scary is the number of people who continued to believe it even after predictions failed to materialize. The explanation was that the events did happen, but on another timeline, or something like that.

    This also reminds me of a group of people who believed the world was going to stop spinning. This was circa 2000 and was perpetuated by a lady who, if I recall correctly, lived in Wisconsin. There were forums and chat rooms with devotees in it. On the day it was to occur, people in the chat rooms were telling how they were personally feeling the world slow down and then stop.

    Reply

  • daric

    daric

    March 10, 2015, 7:11 am

    > Looking into those I found that the way those are made leads to a dilution of more than there are atoms in existence.

    I can't speak for the theory behind homeopathy, but I'd have to say that much the same skepticism is directed toward Chinese medical theory, since much of it is based, for instance, on the concept of qi (or ch'i), which lacks credibility in modern scientific circles.

    I could argue this stuff in depth, but I'll just say that it's in applying these seemingly archaic theories that many of the healing effects are achieved. So in many cases, there's more than meets the eye.

    Reply

  • Z80

    Z80

    March 10, 2015, 6:11 pm

    >Um, the rapist was hiding out in countries where extradition did not apply.

    Oh come on. I didn't know Europe was another Afghanistan and Pakistan!

    Couldn't those silly guys just wait in front of the house of this criminal in Switzerland or just arrest him in one of the Gstaad restaurants at night years ago?

    How about just going in one of his movie stages like The Ninth Gate, The Pianist, Oliver Twist or the Ghost and secretly arresting him?

    We can capture people all over the world and sending them to Guantanamo but this one was a tough guy?

    Get off your high heals of child protector and covering stupidity of US justice while we are killing Afghan kids and women by dozen in the name of collateral damage and forcing thousands of Iraqi women to prostitution all over the region in the name of freedom.

    We had 30 years putting this asshole in prison.

    Reply

  • suckonthis

    suckonthis

    March 11, 2015, 2:55 am

    I'm not being snarky but I have to ask. I get that you are proud of being Southern, but you have to know that just because you have views on the flag doesn't mean other people's views about it are wrong. Many people, myself included, see it as supporting a period (in a sickeningly nostalgic way) of history that was pretty much shitty for black people. The war may not have "started" because of slavery but let's not kid ourselves that that was a major point of contention. The confederate flag came out of the war. It's always been used almost like some sort of sentimental reference to the ante-bellum south (and slavery), not the south, period. You know that.

    Do you just not care if you seriously offend others?

    Reply

  • lay-z

    lay-z

    March 11, 2015, 5:44 am

    I've always wondered how the people who think it's okay to display the rebel flag would feel about tories flying the union jack after the revolutionary war, or after the mexican-american war to have people flying the mexican flag in territory that ended up under US control. I frankly don't have a problem with either of those (especially a few hundred years after the fact), but I feel like the (*warning* gross generalization ahead) kind of people that proudly display the rebel flag would not be (and in fact are not) too keen on residents of southern California proudly displaying mexican flags to celebrate their heritage.

    Reply

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